Deaf Empowerment

Deaf Empowerment

Emergence, Struggle, and Rhetoric

Book - 1997
Rate this:
Chicago Distribution Center
Employing the methodology successfully used to explore other social movements in America, this meticulous study examines the rhetorical foundation that motivated Deaf people to work for social change during the past two centuries. In clear, concise prose, Jankowski begins by explaining her use of the term social movement in relation to the desire for change among Deaf people and analyzes the rhetoric they used, not limited to spoken language, to galvanize effective action.

Central to Deaf Empowerment is the struggle between the dominant hearing society and Deaf people over the best means of communication, with the educational setting as the constant battleground. This evocative work first tracks the history of interaction between these two factions, highlighting the speaking majority’s desire to compel Deaf people to conform to ?the human sciences” conventionality by learning speech. Then, it sharply focuses on the development of the Deaf social movement's ideology to seek general recognition of sign language as a valid cultural variation. Also, the influence of social movements of the 60s and 70s is examined in relation to the changing context and perception of the Deaf movement, as well as to its rhetorical refinement.

Deaf Empowerment delineates the apex of effective Deaf rhetoric in describing the success of the Deaf President Now! protest at Gallaudet University in 1988, its aftermath, and ensuing strategies. It concludes with an assessment of the goal of a multicultural society and offers suggestions for community building through a new humanitarianism. Scholars of social movements and Deaf studies will find it to be a uniquely provocative addition to their libraries and classrooms.


Baker & Taylor
Examines the social movements of the deaf in America from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present, and discusses how advocates for the deaf adopted methods from other social revolutions to accomplish their goals.

Book News
Examines the Deaf social movement in America from its inception in the mid-19th century through its growth and empowerment in the late 20th century. Traces how Deaf advocates adopted tactics from the civil rights movement, the movement for women's rights, and other social revolutions to achieve their goals. The author then analyzes how the tactics used led to social change for Deaf people, including the Deaf President Now! protest and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Gallaudet University Press, 1997
ISBN: 9781563680618
1563680610
Characteristics: viii, 197 p. : ill. ; 24 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...
No similar edition of this title was found at WPL.

Try searching for Deaf Empowerment to see if WPL owns related versions of the work.


  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top