Dante and the Sense of Transgression

Dante and the Sense of Transgression

The Trespass of the Sign

eBook - 2012
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Bloomsbury Pub Plc
In Dante and the
Sense of Transgression
, William Franke combines literary-critical analysis
with philosophical and theological reflection to cast new light on Dante's
poetic vision. Conversely, Dante's medieval masterpiece becomes our guide
to rethinking some of the most pressing issues of contemporary theory.
Beyond suggestive
archetypes like Adam and Ulysses that hint at an obsession with transgression
beneath Dante's overt suppression of it, there is another and a prior sense in
which transgression emerges as Dante's essential and ultimate gesture.
His work as a poet culminates in the
Paradiso in a
transcendence of language towards a purely ineffable, mystical experience
beyond verbal expression. Yet Dante conveys this experience, nevertheless,
in and through language and specifically through the transgression of language,
violating its normally representational and referential functions.
Paradiso's
dramatic sky-scapes and unparalleled textual performances stage a
deconstruction of the sign that is analyzed philosophically in the light of
Blanchot, Levinas, Derrida, Barthes, and Bataille, as transgressing and
transfiguring the very sense of sense.


NBN
William Franke reads Dante's poetic language in the Paradiso in the light of contemporary critical theory by such thinkers as Derrida, Blanchot and Bataille.


McMillan Palgrave

In Dante and the
Sense of Transgression, William Franke combines literary-critical analysis
with philosophical and theological reflection to cast new light on Dante's
poetic vision. Conversely, Dante's medieval masterpiece becomes our guide
to rethinking some of the most pressing issues of contemporary theory.
Beyond suggestive
archetypes like Adam and Ulysses that hint at an obsession with transgression
beneath Dante's overt suppression of it, there is another and a prior sense in
which transgression emerges as Dante's essential and ultimate gesture.
His work as a poet culminates in the Paradiso in a
transcendence of language towards a purely ineffable, mystical experience
beyond verbal expression. Yet Dante conveys this experience, nevertheless,
in and through language and specifically through the transgression of language,
violating its normally representational and referential functions. Paradiso's
dramatic sky-scapes and unparalleled textual performances stage a
deconstruction of the sign that is analyzed philosophically in the light of
Blanchot, Levinas, Derrida, Barthes, and Bataille, as transgressing and
transfiguring the very sense of sense.


William Franke reads Dante's poetic language in the Paradiso in the light of contemporary critical theory by such thinkers as Derrida, Blanchot and Bataille.



Publisher: London ; New York : Continuum, Ă2012
ISBN: 9781441150288
1441150285
9781441160423
1441160426
9781441136916
1441136916
1441150285
9781441185020
144118502X
Characteristics: 1 online resource

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