Drama, Performance and Debate

Drama, Performance and Debate

Theatre and Public Opinion in the Early Modern Period

eBook - 2013
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Book News
This collection of fifteen essays examines examples of plays that were either meant to be performed or read. They cover personal expression in a play performed in Puy de Notre-Dame in Amiens, diplomacy in papal Rome under Alexander VI, the university and public space in France (1490-1520), the theater society in Amsterdam in the 1530s, the heresy trial against the playwright Gnaphens and the Lutheran church as theater, genesis and gender in fireworks displays in the entry of Charles and his son Philip in Antwerp, staged conversations in topical discourse in Dutch biblical plays, the peasant as the mouthpiece of public opinion in sixteenth and seventeenth Dutch theater, unintentional and intentional topics in a 1610 play, moral issues in the portrayal of passions from 1637, the Dutch Revolt on stage, a school drama, staging a sixteenth-century performance, and moving toward an anatomy of drama in the seventeenth century. Annotation ©2013 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Brill USA
In this volume fifteen contributions discuss the role or roles of early modern ('literary' and non-literary) forms of theatre in the formation of public opinion or its use in making statements in public or private debates.

Publisher: Leiden ; Boston : Brill, ©2013
ISBN: 9789004236998
9004236996
9004240632
9789004240636
Characteristics: 1 online resource (vi, 373 pages) : illustrations

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