But the Irish Sea Betwixt Us

But the Irish Sea Betwixt Us

Ireland, Colonialism, and Renaissance Literature

eBook - 1999
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University of Kentucky

" At the rise of the Tudor age, England began to form a national identity. With that sense of self came the beginnings of the colonialist notion of the ""other."" Ireland, however, proved a most difficult other because it was so closely linked, both culturally and geographically, to England. Ireland's colonial position was especially complex because of the political, religious, and ethnic heritage it shared with England. Andrew Murphy asserts that the Irish were seen not as absolute but as ""proximate"" others. As a result, English writing about Ireland was a problematic process, since standard colonial stereotypes never quite fit the Irish. But the Irish Sea Betwixt Us examines the English view of the ""imperfect"" other by looking at Ireland through works by Spenser, Jonson, and Shakespeare. Murphy also considers a broad range of materials from the Renaissance period, including journals, pamphlets, histories, and state papers.


At the rise of the Tudor age, England began to form a national identity. With that sense of self came the beginnings of the colonialist notion of the "other"" Ireland, however, proved a most difficult other because it was so closely linked, both culturally and geographically, to England. Ireland's colonial position was especially complex because of the political, religious, and ethnic heritage it shared with England. Andrew Murphy asserts that the Irish were seen not as absolute but as "proximate" others. As a result, English writing about Ireland was a problematic process, since standard colonial stereotypes never quite fit the Irish.But the Irish Sea Betwixt Us examines the English view of the "imperfect" other by looking at Ireland through works by Spenser, Jonson, and Shakespeare. Murphy also considers a broad range of materials from the Renaissance period, including journals, pamphlets, histories, and state papers.



Book News
Examines the unique position of the Irish in England's colonial conception of the world, which is based on Ireland's shared ethnic and religious heritage with the English. Grounding his work in colonial and postcolonial theory, Murphy (English, U. of St. Andrews) challenges this strictly colonial representation of Ireland. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell North Amer
For the last two decades, scholars have debated the influence of Irish politics on English Renaissance literature. In these studies, Ireland has been equated with the New World as the object of colonialism. But the Irish Sea Betwixt Us challenges this notion, arguing that the attitude of the English toward Ireland differed significantly from their vision of the New World.
But the Irish Sea Betwixt Us examines the English view of the "imperfect" other by looking at Ireland through works by Gerald of Wales, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson. Grounding his work in colonial and postcolonial theory, Murphy uses Renaissance-era journals, pamphlets, histories, and state papers to challenge the strictly colonial representation of Ireland, revealing a much more complex portrait of the relationship between the two islands.

Publisher: Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, ©1999
ISBN: 9780813170138
0813170133
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xii, 227 pages)

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