The Big Bang Theory and Philosophy

The Big Bang Theory and Philosophy

Rock, Paper, Scissors, Aristotle, Locke

eBook - 2012
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A lighthearted meditation on the philosophical quandaries of the hit television show The Big Bang TheoryEver wonder what Aristotle might say about the life Sheldon Cooper leads? Why Thomas Hobbes would applaud the roommate agreement? Who Immanuel Kant would treat with "haughty derision" for weaving "un-unravelable webs?" And--most importantly--whether Wil Wheaton is truly evil? Of course you have. Bazinga!This book mines the deep thinking of some of history's most potent philosophical minds to explore your most pressing questions about The Big Bang Theory and its nerdy genius characters. You mig.
Publisher: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, 2012
ISBN: 9781118236413
1118236416
9781118222522
1118222520
Characteristics: 1 online resource : chart
Additional Contributors: Irwin, William 1970-

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mikemarotta
Dec 31, 2017

The book is not a total loss: some interesting points, tidbits of knowledge, and some amusement are to be found. If you love the show, you can probably stand most of this book. Overall, this was a big whimper.

These seventeen essays come mostly from professors of philosophy. It is part of a “pop culture and philosophy” series that includes South Park and Philosophy, and The Big Lebowsky and Philosophy, among 28 titles, with more announced, including The Simpsons and Philosophy. The non-judgmental range of titles is internally consistent with the post-modernist presentation here.

The book starts out well with “Aristotle on Sheldon Cooper: Ancient Greek Meets Modern Geek” by Greg Littman (professor of philosophy at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville). “Should you live like Sheldon Cooper? Think hard because you don’t have the luxury of not making a choice. Fourteen billion years after the Big Bang, evolution has finally produced a type of animal, human beings, that must choose how it will live.” From there, entropy takes over and the observations, opinions, and “thoughts” have less potential.

Doctoral candidate in political philosophy Ruth E. Lowe displayed typical ignorance in Chapter 13 (on tolerance and toleration) when she says that “scientists told us the Earth was flat.” They did not. Ample evidence shows the ancient Greek philosophers knew that the Earth is a sphere. Likewise, Mackonis seems to think that if a statement is 80% likely to be true, then this somehow creates multivalued logic with an included middle, blanking out on the meaning of the meaning of "probability."

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