Untapped

Untapped

The Scramble for Africa's Oil

Book - 2007
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Houghton
Although Africa has long been known to be rich in oil, extracting it hadn’t seemed worth the effort and risk until recently. But with the price of Middle Eastern crude oil skyrocketing and advancing technology making reserves easier to tap, the region has become the scene of a competition between major powers that recalls the nineteenth-century scramble for colonization there. Already the United States imports more of its oil from Africa than from Saudi Arabia, and China, too, looks to the continent for its energy security.

What does this giddy new oil boom meanfor America, for the world, for Africans themselves? To find out, John Ghazvinian traveled through twelve African countriesfrom Sudan to Congo to Angolatalking to warlords, industry executives, bandits, activists, priests, missionaries, oil-rig workers, scientists, and ordinary people whose lives have been transformednot necessarily for the betterby the riches beneath their feet. The result is a high-octane narrative that reveals the challenges, obstacles, reasons for despair, and reasons for hope emerging from the world’s newest energy hot spot.



Baker & Taylor
Draws on interviews with people from twelve African nations, including warlords, industry executives, activists, missionaries, oil-rig workers, scientists, and ordinary people, to analyze the political, economic, social, and cultural effects of the African oil boom on everyday life in the region.

Harcourt Publishing
Although Africa has long been known to be rich in oil, extracting it hadn’t seemed worth the effort and risk until recently. But with the price of Middle Eastern crude oil skyrocketing and advancing technology making reserves easier to tap, the region has become the scene of a competition between major powers that recalls the nineteenth-century scramble for colonization there. Already the United States imports more of its oil from Africa than from Saudi Arabia, and China, too, looks to the continent for its energy security.

What does this giddy new oil boom mean—for America, for the world, for Africans themselves? To find out, John Ghazvinian traveled through twelve African countries—from Sudan to Congo to Angola—talking to warlords, industry executives, bandits, activists, priests, missionaries, oil-rig workers, scientists, and ordinary people whose lives have been transformed—not necessarily for the better—by the riches beneath their feet. The result is a high-octane narrative that reveals the challenges, obstacles, reasons for despair, and reasons for hope emerging from the world’s newest energy hot spot.



Book News
In 2001, Iranian-born Ghazvinian (history, U. of Pennsylvania) set out on a six-month trip through 12 sub-Sahara African countries to get some first-hand information about challenges, obstacles, and reasons for hope and despair concerning oil from the region. He talked to politicians and political prisoners, economists and oil-rig workers, warlords and rebel militia leaders, diplomats and bankers, and others. He also visited Washington, London, and Paris. The result is a snapshot, he says, of a moment when Africa seems on the verge of playing in the big game. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: Orlando : Harcourt, c2007
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780151011384
Characteristics: xv, 320 p. : map ; 24 cm

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